Saturday, February 26, 2011

Great Walled City of Europe - Dubrovnik

Dubrovnik - Croatia 

Go there!

This walled City was described by Lord Byron as "The Pearl of the Adriatic".
The town was founded in the 7th century on a site called Ragusium by the Romans. It was under the protection of the Byzantine Empire between 867 and 1205, of Venice until 1358, of Hungary until 1526, and of the Ottoman Empire until 1806, but remained largely self-governing as an independent republic. In the 16th century Dubrovnik had one of the greatest merchant fleets in the Mediterranean, and it remained the chief cultural centre for the South Slavs until the 19th century. Napoleon abolished the city-republic of Dubrovnik in 1808, and the Congress of Vienna ceded the town to Austria in 1815. By the terms of the Treaty of Rapallo (1920) following World War I, the town became part of the newly created Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (later Yugoslavia). During World War II Dubrovnik was occupied by Italian and German forces. In 1991, when Croatia declared its independence from Yugoslavia, Serbian forces laid siege to and bombarded the town, destroying many sites of historical importance. It has now been fully restored to its former Glory.

Dubrovnik port

Dubrovnik Street

Dubrovnik (Croatian pronunciation: [ˈdǔbroːʋniːk]) (Italian: Ragusa), is a Croatian city on theAdriatic Sea coast positioned at the terminal end of the Isthmus of Dubrovnik. It is one of the most prominent tourist destinations on the Adriatic, a seaport and the center of Dubrovnik-Neretva county. Its population was 43,770 in 2001, down from 49,728 in 1991. In 1979, the city of Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.
The prosperity of the city of Dubrovnik has always been based on maritime trade. In the Middle Ages, as the Republic of Ragusa, also known as Maritime Republic (together with Amalfi, Pisa, Genoa, Venice and other cities), it became the only eastern Adriatic city-state to rival Venice. Supported by its wealth and skilled diplomacy, the city achieved a remarkable level of development, particularly during the 15th and 16th centuries. Although demilitarised in the 1970s with the intent of forever protecting it from war devastation, in 1991, after the breakup of Yugoslavia, it was besieged by Serb-Montenegrin forces for 7 months and heavily damaged by shelling.

  Join me on the New Digg  Follow verseilie on Twitter

No comments:

Post a Comment